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Covered in Bees

Blipfoto.com

Wednesday 25 January 2012: Computers Throughout History

I used to be able to put together a computer through trial and error. I actually made one go bang once with a little puff of smoke and a smell that wasn't good.

In the old days (where this motherboard came from) I used to use little bits of sweetcorn as they were brilliant at transmitting data. You might have occasionally had an old computer crash on you and had the screen go blue? Then you'd sometimes get a Kernel Error? That was when whoever built the PC had used poor quality sweetcorn.

As you can see from the photo, I used quality '104' Sweetcorn Kernels. Pretty much the best you could get. If you wanted to impress your girlfriend you might go for '106' Sweetcorn that cost double and was a *bit* better. I've actually seen girls *swoon* after their boyfriends extoled the virtues of '106' for an hour or two. Me - I used to go for '104' and use the spare money to take my girlfriend(s) (I had loads) to the arcade to play Wack-A-Mole.

The green ones (corn - not girlfriends) at the back got caught by virii (that's geek speak for viruses)!

The one consistent thing though about PC's was that they always crashed sooner or later. I used to see people tearing their hair out and getting *really* angry about this, so to try and resolve this I always put 3 little Tibetan Prayer Wheels on the motherboard for people to spin and pray that they hadn't lost their saved game of Freecell.

The wheels did bugger all but they provided a distraction for the user.

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