gennepher

By gennepher

Writer and Musician...

The inscription reads...

CHARLES TINDAL GATTY F.S.A.
WRITER AND MUSICIAN
SON OF THE REVEREND ALFRED
GATTY D.D. AND MARGARET
DAUGHTER OF THE REVEREND
ALEXANDER JOHN SCOTT D.D.
BORN FOURTEENTH DAY OF
NOVEMBER 1851 IN THE COUNTY
OF YORK DIED EIGHTH DAY OF
JUNE 1928 REQUIESCAT IN PACE

I have passed this grave many a time. It is in the old Eccleston graveyard and I have done a short You Tube video of it if you want to have a peek here

I am afraid I am little wobbly holding the camera!

Here is a little info on the guy...

'MR. C. T. GATTY, F.S.A.
Mr. Charles Tindal Gatty, F.S.A., of 45 Westbourne Street, Pimlico, S.W., formerly Curator of the Liverpool Museum, and private secretary to Lord Bute, and afterwards to Mr. T. E. Ellis, the chief Ministerial Whip, died on June 8, aged seventy-six years, leaving £6,680 Os. 10d., with net personalty £6,387 8s. id. Probate is granted to Denis Hyde, of 47 Westbourne Street, S.W. The bequests include :—To the Abbot and Benedictine Community of Downside College, Bath, a small French fourteenth-century ivory diptych, a Spanish mahogany crucifix, framed and glazed, two volumes of Sir Thomas More's English works printed in 1557, a framed page of fourteenth-century Liturgical MS. "given me by John Ruskin," his library of books on Dialling and his dials in ivory, Erasmus' Colloquies printed in Frankfort in 1562, St. Augustine's Confessions printed in 1620, hymn books and notes made when preparing Arundel Hymns, and the copyright in the Arundel Hymns in which "I was joint proprietor with the late Duke of Norfolk." '

His books have been digitised and can be found to read here

He was very much interested in antiquities and was instrumental in collecting the Arundel Hymns here

Here is some more info on his life from The Tablet here

'Page 18, 16th June 1928

OBITUARY

MR. C. T. GATTY, F.S.A.
Mr. Charles Tindal Gatty, F.S.A., antiquary, author, and lecturer, died, we regret to state, on the 8th inst., in a London nursing home. By his death there is removed a cultured and interesting personality, a man with a great number of friends both in this country, and in Ireland. Mr. Gatty, who was seventy-seven, was a convert. He was the son of the Rev. Alfred Gatty, D.D. Vicar of Ecclesfield; his mother was the daughter of the Rev. Dr. Scott. Educated at the Charterhouse School, he later obtained the post of Curator of the Liverpool Museum, where he laboured for twelve years; he was next, for two years, private secretary to the convert Marquis of Bute; and in 1891 he took up the editorship of a paper started by Lord Wolverton at Yeovil. Mr. Gatty made an unsuccessful attempt, in 1892, to enter Parliament as Home Rule candidate for West Dorset, and later he held a secretarial appointment under the Chief Ministerial Whip, Mr. Ellis. In 1903 he went to Dublin, where he was a chief 'figure in promoting the Irish Art Companions, with a view to encouraging native talent in productive industry and good craftsmanship on the artistic side. He afterwards returned to England and lived here until the end.
Mr. Gatty both lectured and wrote on behalf of the Church of his adoption, and was well known also by several writings on history and biography, and by his joint editorship, with the late Duke of Norfolk, in the compilation of Arundel Hymns. One of his first essays in Catholic defence after his reception into the Church was A Letter on the Revival of the Catholic Faith in England, published by the C.T.S. in the 'early years of that society's work. He wrote also a book on The Mystery Drama of Parsifal; and in The Spirit of the Holy Court he brought together a selection of passages from Hawkins's translation of Father Nicolas Caussin's classic. Recognita, George Wyndham was a literary monument of affection to that brilliant statesman, whom he had numbered among his personal friends. A study on the historical side, with many biographical notes also, brought the elaborate account, in two volumes, of Mary Davies and the Manor of Ebury, considered by many to be Mr. Gatty's best and most interesting work. The book was written from a mass of material discovered among unsorted muniments at Eaton Hall, and is a valuable contribution to the history of West London.
The funeral took place on Tuesday last at Eccleston, near Chester. On the previous day a requiem Mass was celebrated in London at St. Jamees, Spanish Place.R.I.P.'

There is an interesting pdf which tells you of the Liverpool Museums and here is an excerpt from it ...

'Picton proposed that the council should show its gratitude to Mayer by
commissioning a statue of him for the great hall of St George’s Hall. Mayer
chose the London sculptor Giovanni Fontana, and the statue was unveiled in
September 1869. The council also agreed to appoint a curator for his collection in the museum. The first was H. Ecroyd Smith, who held the post for four years, and he was replaced by Charles Tindal Gatty. For years to come the museum would have two parts – the Mayer Museum of art and antiquities led by Gatty, and the Derby Museum of natural history led by the head of the museum, Thomas Moore. '

But what is more interesting in this pdf is the actual history which I got totally absorbed in it.

I am not sure if this link will work within blip so here is it for you to copy and paste in your browser if necessary http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/wml/history/wml_150_years.pdf

The early chapters on how the museum began and their early mistakes are fascinating. also funny is someone brought, I presume stuffed, a Kiwi (from New Zealand) to the museum. Everyone thought it was a fake and they had to turn it inside out or something to realised it was a real bird.

After today because I am taking too much time researching which I find absolutely fascinating, and totally riveting I am going to have to stop doing these gravestones for a bit.

I get totally immersed in anything I do. I will have to think of something different to do!

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