The Lozarithm Lens

By lozarithm

The Old Forge (Wednesday 17th April 2019)

We had a convivial and productive Gardening Wednesday afternoon this week, sunny and warm enough to sit outside for tea breaks. The front yard is looking good and in the morning I photographed these wonderful purple-black tulips (Tulipa 'Paul Scherer') using the LX100 with a close-up +1 attachment, currently my go-to set up for such things. They were last seen budding a fortnight ago.

L.
18.4.2019 (1222 hr)

Blip #2899 (#2649 + 250 archived blips taken 27.8.1960-18.3.2010)
Consecutive Blip #20
Blips/Extras In 2019 #76/265 + #035/100 Extras
Day #3309 (670 gaps from 26.3.2010)
LOTD #2041 (#1882 + 159 in archived blips)

Old Forge series
Flora series
Macro series
Gardens series
Front Yard series
Spring series

Taken with Panasonic/Leica DMC-LX100 M4/3 compact with close-up +1 lens attachment
 
Lozarhythm Of The Day:
Sandy Denny - Silver Threads And Golden Needles (recorded April-June 1976, Island Studios, London)
Sandy Denny (vcl) with Jerry Donahue (el gtr), Pat Donaldson (bass), Timi Donald (dr), The Ladybirds (vcl) and The Silver Band: John Hudson, Alan Holmes, Ray Grand, Gordon Bland, David White, Robert Richards, Peter Lockett & Philip Goodwin
My album of the day was Rendezvous, Sandy Denny's last studio album before her untimely death. It wasn't her best album as her voice was tired and the production by husband Trevor Lucas is somewhat overblown, but the album is still magnificent by average standards.
This one track features the Silver Band, beautifully arranged by Robert Kirby, known for his work for Nick Drake.
The song was co-written by Nashville country music producer Jack Rhodes and the first recording, perhaps surprisingly, was by Wanda Jackson on a 1956 B-side. The Springfields (with Dusty) recorded it in Nashville in 1962 and had an unlikely US hit with it in the years before the Beatles and the British Invasion, when such things were very rare. This led to the Everly Brothers recording it and then Linda Ronstadt popularised the tune in the seventies. Soon everyone from Dolly Parton to Crystal Gayle were creating their own versions.

One year ago:
The Old Forge

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